Inspirational Magazine On Sale Now


If you enjoy the 'Heroes of Coal' website, you can now order a fantastic glossy magazine.

It is packed with stunning archive images from over a century of coal-mining in Wales, showing how the industry became a way of life for generations of ordinary men and women.

Click Here to order a copy of the 'Heroes of Coal' magazine, which costs £4.99, plus p&p.


Available Now


Heroes of Coal magazine is a fantastic souvenir, packed full of memories, for anyone touched by the mining industry.
OFFER PRICE: £2.50
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Unique Calendar On Sale


Salute the Welsh Heroes of Coal every month with this special calendar that records the courage and passion of the miners who helped to mould the history of an industry that is part of the fabric of Wales

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Heroes of Coal 2012 Calendar can be ordered now - OFFER PRICE £3 plus p&p (UK)

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Coal Mine Workers Memories


From: Susan Ruth
(You may have already received this and, if so, my apologies. My internet went out right when I submitted it...)

It’s a cool, foggy morning in April 1941. Miners are gathering at Crummies Creek to organize the day’s picket… standard picketing routine. But this morning’s different, and it doesn’t take long to find that out –

“We was just a-millin’ about, a-talkin’ about how we was gonna set up our picket line. All of a sudden, it sounded to me like we was in a war! Bullets was flyin’ all around us. Miners was a-callin’ out to take cover and took to runnin’…”

The miners had been ambushed by the opposition. They triangulated their target and controlled the high ground. The place was a killing field…and the old miner was right in the thick of it. And because of what he soon discovers, he describes it as the worst day of his life.

The above is taken from “Memory of a Miner,” a new book my husband, Dr. Michael Ruth, wrote about his dad’s true-life experiences as an old-school coal miner in “bloody Harlan” (Harlan Co KY) in the early coato mid 1900s.

We believe what his dad and mother went through – the joy and sadness, successes and failures they experienced – can be a real inspiration to those who know and love mining and miners... who are now fighting to keep the industry alive and save their jobs.

On the flip side, the old miner was also a crackerjack, both on and off the job… and his stories prove it! In addition to the difficult times, “Memory” includes ample examples of the good times they all shared together. (You can visit www.memoryofaminer.com to find out more.)

We really hope you can help us get the word out about Memory of a Miner by sharing it with your community.

Either way, our thanks to each and every one of you for the job you do every day and what it means for all of us.

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